Tuesday, August 23, 2011

NABE SURVEY ON DEBT REMEDIES: ONE SURVEY, SPUN THREE WAYS

CSM:
At a time when Republicans in Congress are digging in their heels against raising more federal tax revenue, private-sector economists are sending an opposite signal in a new poll.



Some three-quarters of economists who do forecasting for the private sector say tax revenue should rise as part of efforts to tame unsustainable budget deficits, according to the survey released Monday by the National Association for Business Economics (NABE)
NJ:

Lawmakers aren’t the only ones who can't agree on what to do to fix the economy.

Business economists are split on whether a restrictive fiscal policy or more stimulus will give the flailing U.S. economy the boost that it needs, according to a survey released by the National Association for Business Economics on Monday.

Nearly half of those surveyed by NABE say that they would like to see a more restrictive fiscal policy in the next two years, while 37 percent of the respondents would opt for a more stimulative approach.

As Washington readies itself for another fiscal fight, lawmakers will have to decide how to balance raising tax revenues and cutting spending in order to reduce the federal deficit.

More than half -- 56 percent -- of economists surveyed said they favor reducing the deficit only or mostly through spending cuts; only about 7 percent of economists favored only or mostly tax increases. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said that they would prefer an approach that is equal parts spending cuts and tax increases.

WP:

The White House’s assertion that credible economists “all agreed” with Obama’s approach was untrue, and many doubters are now stepping forward to sound the alarm. The Associated Press reported:

The majority of economists surveyed by the National Association for Business Economics believe that the federal deficit should be reduced only or primarily through spending cuts.
The survey out Monday found that 56 percent of the NABE members surveyed felt that way, while 37 percent said they favor equal parts spending cuts and tax increases. The remaining 7 percent believe it should be done only or mostly through tax increases.
2-OUT-OF-3 ANALYSTS AGREE: A MAJORITY OF NABE ECONOMISTS SURVEYED WANT SPENDING CUTS.



CSM IS NOT REPORTING; THEY ARE PROPAGANDIZING FOR THE LEFT.



MORE HERE.

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